Tag Archives: Chinese Elm

Design and Critique #9 – Chinese Elm

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Masculine vs Feminine:

This tree is very feminine in many ways. The delicate branching with movement complements the movement in the slender trunks. A rounded canopy is the crowning feminine characteristic that pulls everything together.

Design:

The trunks all fill their own space that is designated for them. This is an easy thing to venture off from with multi-trunked trees or forests. The pad formation seems to be more distinct on the left side. I’m not sure if that was intentional or part of the development of the tree.

Comments:

I would love a pot that is a bit more shallow and feminine to fit the feeling of the tree. The pot being a bit oversized might have to do with it being displayed constantly and not being able to have a huge amount of personal attention.

I’m not really a fan of the stone it is shown with or how close it is displayed to the tree.

I think a few of the branches when viewed up close look unnatural in the ways they bend.

Next Up:

Larch

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Design and Critique #8 – Flowering Plum

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Focus:

The focus of this tree is the trunk and the flowers. These two features are so stunning that they overwhelm the display. This takes your attention off of any flaws that might exist.

Branching and Silhouette:

While the branching and ramification leave much to be desired, the silhouette still holds an asymmetrical shape with 3 dimensional aspects.

Comments:

I’m not 100% sure on the size of the stand. I feel it is a bit oversized which takes away from the feminine aspects of the tree. I also feel the pot color fits much better with the purple leaves of a purple-leaf plum (exact species not listed) but it doesn’t mesh as well with the light pink flowers. I do love the companion plant choice. Fantastic tree overall.

Next Up:

Chinese Elm

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Chinese Elm Repot

This is my favorite little tree I have at the moment. I’ve been excited for this repot as it’ll finally put the tree into a pot that is correctly sized. The constricted environment that it will provide will increase ramification and give it a smaller leaf size.

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Started by cutting the wires on the bottom in the middle, then making a flush cut to make sure they aren’t jagged when I drag them through the root mass.
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This little guy grew pretty vigorously for 1 year after a repot.
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Raked out the roots to see what I really had to work with.
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I put some soil in and tried to get a better idea of what would fit in the pot.
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I prepped the pot with the drain screen and wire ready to take in the tree. img_3290
I’m going to cut the two wires at an angle and fish them through the main portion of the roots or the ‘shin’ of the tree. You then bend them over once they’re through the shin and use that as a means to anchor the tree down.
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As you can see here, the wires become buried and hidden in the rootball.
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I then piled up the Akadama and chopsticked it in.
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I used Akadama as I can use this to be able to scale the roots and branches to get them finer and finer. For a deciduous tree in refinement this is how you can get the most fine ramification.
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Then the topdressing. This is to help keep the moisture even throughout the Akadama and help with moisture loss on the top portion of the soil.
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From the top down. Obviously it is going to get some pruning before the Spring comes in.

It made it through one night of sub 32° weather that I missed, but has leafed out without too many issues.

 

Bonsai-A-Thon

I went to Bonsai-A-Thon at The Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens. Here were the trees on display for the exhibition. DSC_0580
Japanese Black Pine
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Flowering PlumDSC_0589
Shimpaku Juniper
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Coast Live Oak
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Shimpaku JuniperIMG_3838
Cedar ElmIMG_3845IMG_3847
Chinese ElmIMG_3851
Shohin Display
Japanese Black Pine, Silverberry (Eleagnus Pungens), Chinese Elm, Korean Hornbeam, Japanese Quince
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Satsuki Azalea (on the left) IMG_3853IMG_3854IMG_3855IMG_3856IMG_3857IMG_3859

The amount of trees was a bit less than I expected, but they were all great regardless. The flowering plum, coast live oak, and the large shimpaku juniper were my favorites. The oak didn’t have any large scaring that was unsightly, it was amazing.

55th Annual Winter Silhouettes Exhibition

Here are the display photos I took from the exhibition. Enjoy!

Here is a video taken and posted by someone in the club I assume:

Some names and species weren’t displayed when I attended. They were a bit behind in setting up the exhibition, so sorry if I missed your display or information!

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Chinese Elm – Ellen Keneshea

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Korean Hornbeam – Lindsay Shiba

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Persian Quince – Steve Valentine

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Cork Bark Elm – Michael Roberts

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Cork Bark Elm – Tom Vuomo

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Chi Chi Ginkgo – Jim Barrett

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Chinese Elm – Joe Galgoul

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Pomegranate – Charlie Washburn

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Chinese Elm – Carol Upston

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Pomegranate – Charlie Washburn

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Contorted Quince – Tom Lau

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Trident Maple – Kathy Benson

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Chinese Elm – Marge Blasingame

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Flowering Pear – Mr/Mrs Manning

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Pomegranate Forest – John Nielson

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Contorted Quince – Shirley Quan

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Cork Bark Elm – Mel Ikeda

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Crape Myrtle

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Coral Bark Maple – Ed Clark

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Chinese Elm – Dick Ryerson

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Korean Hornbeam – Alex Marien

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Design and Critique #4 – Pine and Elm Display

3 point bonsai display

Display of Trees:

The trees flow well from the main tree to the sides by placing both the Elm and the companion plant in a direction that the foliage and branching suggest. The stands are also perfectly chosen to contrast the tree on top.

The flow of the Pine is directed towards the left, as is the flow of the Elm. This is shown by the defining branch on the lowest part of the tree combined with the flow of the apex of both trees. You can also see the silhouette of the apex drawing a line to the next tree.

Branching:

The literati styled Pine has a great defining branch on the left that sets the longest part of the tree. This helps it accomplish asymmetry rather than the unrealistic perfect symmetry. The trunk doesn’t have any outrageous bends, but has consistent movement which fits nicely with the literati style.

The Elm has good branching, but the taper from the thick trunk to the smaller branches lets you know that it was developed from a larger trunk chop. I would love to see this same display in Fall to see the yellow elm leaves combined with that fantastic blue pot.

Comments:

I love the display stands for this display. Well chosen and very fitting for the accompanying trees.

The feminine pot is a perfect elegant choice for the pine tree. Flowing rim of the pot with a tapered bottom enhances the movements of the tree without dominating the display.

The Elm has a nontraditional lower branch on the left, but I like it. It really helps to balance the tree and serve as a defining branch.

Next Up:

Winter Bonsai Display

Plans For The Elm

This elm had a rough year. I was hoping to get better ramified branching this year after repotting, but instead of ramification and smaller leaves I got long internodes, vigorous growth, and a near death experience when I left for vacation.

I have this blue pot that I’m excited to combine with the yellow color of the Fall leaves on this Elm.

Both the trunk and the pot are pretty feminine in design, and will compliment each other nicely once combined. The smaller size of the pot will help to facilitate smaller leaves and internodes. Hopefully I can get a bit more progression in refinement this next year.